New Print Titles on Regulatory Law, Res Judicata, Drafting Wills and more

New titles and updated editions have now arrived at the Great Library. While we are temporarily closed in person, we can still provide scanned sections of these titles or arrange for pick-up and drop-off. Contact us at library@lawsociety.mb.ca for more information.

Regulatory Law & Practice, 3rd ed.

“While legal professionals are no strangers to regulations, the perplexity of the mechanisms to challenge the validity of regulations and rules makes regulatory law an area of specialized knowledge beyond the reach of most lawyers and government officials. The process by which regulations are made, and the controls imposed by legislatures on the law-making powers of regulators, are also a ‘black box’ little understood by government officials and legislators themselves. Regulatory Law and Practice, 3rd Edition takes a multi-jurisdictional approach to regulatory law principles and regulatory processes, describing case law and regulatory processes in jurisdictions across the Commonwealth and beyond.”

The Doctrine of Res Judicata in Canada, 5th ed.

“The definitive resource on an important legal doctrine: why a person can only sue or be sued once for each case.
The book’s analysis, terminology and description of the law have been adopted by the Supreme Court of Canada, and have been cited on numerous occasions by provincial trial and appellate courts and by tribunals across Canada. The text provides a comprehensive distillation of the res judicata doctrine that has evolved in 200 years of Canadian jurisprudence.“

The Law of Privacy in Canada, 3rd ed

Author Michael Power is a leading authority on Canadian privacy law and issues concerning the protection of personal information. The Law of Privacy, 3rd Edition is a comprehensive treatise providing a thorough overview of Canadian privacy law and includes two main sections:

  • Personal Information Protection in Canada – Legislation and statutes; the meaning of “personal information”; the collection, use and management of personal information in the public, private and health sectors; security and breach notification; borders and boundaries; and enforcement;
  • Privacy – Common law and arbitral decisions; privacy and the Charter; privacy in Canadian tort law, criminal law, and employment.

This book also features a helpful annex that provides guidance on how to manage personal information, including how to build privacy management frameworks and the privacy issues that must be addressed in outsourcing and procurement.

The Encyclopedic Dictionary of Canadian Law

“From the very first entry (“A or a”) to the last (“ZZZZ”), it is clear that this new publication is the most comprehensive Canadian legal dictionary available. It is a thoroughly contemporary, truly essential resource that even includes definitions of common acronyms now used in text slang – a useful addition given the extent to which text messages are now used as evidence in criminal proceedings.”

Drafting Wills in Canada — 3rd edition

“Helpful examples of good and bad drafting, along with dozens of practical tips both for drafting and for managing a wills practice.

What’s New In This Edition?

  • New chapter on First Nations Estates under the Indian Act
  • Comprehensive tax matters section in the Business Interests chapter providing an overview of common income tax planning issues for business owners in the context of estate planning
  • Recent case law, as well as key changes to federal tax law and wills and attorney legislation in several provinces
  • Updated content on dealing with digital assets, charitable giving and graduated rate estates
Dangerous Offender Law

“This new publication is a comprehensive, yet accessible, overview of dangerous offender law in Canada. Written by three experts in the field, including defence counsel and intervenor from the landmark R. v. Boutilier case at the Supreme Court of Canada, Dangerous Offender Law presents criminal justice participants and the Canadian public with a long overdue guide to understanding the complex sentencing regime set out in Part XXIV of Canada’s Criminal Code.”